7/3/15

Flower Travellin' Band 1971


Flower Travellin' Band - 1971 - Satori (full... by meir-rivkin



thx south willard


Flower Travellin' Band (フラワー・トラベリン・バンド Furawā Toraberin Bando?) were a rock band from Japan that was formed in 1968.[1] In Japan they often go by the moniker FTB.
They were connected to Japan's counterculture movement and noted for their mixture of early heavy metal with psychedelic and progressive rock. They received wide acclaim from critics but failed to achieve commercial success and disbanded in 1973 to pursue individual careers.[2]The band reunited in late 2007 when hippie influences became popular again in Japanese fashion, music and cinema; it was permanently disbanded after the 2011 death of vocalist Joe Yamanaka.
While the band's releases have never sold well they continue to be held in high regard by the music industry. Their albums have never been out of print[3] and they continue to be made available on new audiophile formats such as SHM-CDs.[4] The former members of the Flower Travellin' Band continue to perform FTB songs live together under the name Flower Power with other musicians.[5]

[edit]

The band was initially started as a side-project by Yuya Uchida when he returned to Japan after visiting his friend John Lennon in England in the mid 1960s, where he was introduced to various upcoming artists such as Cream and Jimi Hendrix. Yuya wanted to introduce a similar sound to the Japanese, and formed the "Flowers" as a cover band with various group sounds musicians, and two vocalists; male singer Chiba Hiroshi and female singer Remi Aso.[6] They released the album Challenge! in 1968, featuring covers of songs by Jimi Hendrix, Cream, Jefferson Airplane and Big Brother and the Holding Company, in addition to an original song. The cover caused a stir in the Japanese media as it depicted each member posing naked.

Television... The Brian Eno demos and more...

TELEVISION: A Season In Hell
Soooo, here’s a compilation I’ve been working on for a while – an overview of the Richard Hell-era of Television, made up of rehearsals, live recordings and demos recorded between early 1974 and March 1975. Consider it a prequel of sorts to Kingdom Come. While the sound quality is rough on some of these tapes, the music is essential. This was a very different band than the one that would go on to record Marquee Moon a few years later – raw enough to make that album sound like Steely Dan by comparison. But if the playing is amateur-ish in places, it’s almost always thrillingly amateurish. And Hell definitely brought elements to the table that were lost once he was gone – a satirical, tongue-in-cheek humor, and his, um, unique bass stylings. He might not have been a very good bassist at this point, but he sure is enthusiastic, and that’s half the battle, isn’t it? I also get the feeling that Hell was the driving conceptual force behind the band at this stage – dig the elaborate and fanciful press release he penned (reprinted in Bryan Waterman’s excellent 33 1/3 volume): 

TOM VERLAINE - guitar, vocals, music, lyrics: Facts unknown. RICHARD HELL - bass, vocals, lyrics: Chip on shoulder. Mama’s boy. No personality. Highschool dropout. Mean. RICHARD LLOYD - guitar vocals: bleach-blond - mental institutions - male prostitute - suicide attempts. BILLY FICCA - drums: Blues bands in Philadelphia. Doesn’t talk much. Friendly. TELEVISION’s music fulfills the adolescent desire to fuck the girl you never met because you’ve just been run over by a car. Three minute songs of passion performed by four boys who make James Dean look like Little Nemo. Their sound is made distinctive by Hell’s rare Dan Electro bass, one that pops and grunts like no model presently available, and his unique spare patterns. Add to this Richard Lloyd’s blitzcrieg chop on his vintage Telecaster and Verlaine’s leads alternately psychotic Duane Eddy and Segovia on a ukelele with two strings gone. Verlaine, who uses an old Jazzmaster, when asked about the music said, “I don’t know. It tells the story. Like ‘The Hunch’ by the Robert Charles Quintet, or 'Tornado’ by Dale Hawkins. Those cats could track it down. I’ll tell you the secret.”

Richard Hell, ladies and gentlemen, punk’s first PR man. 
Take note! This isn’t a totally comprehensive collection – in particular, interested parties should seek out the Neon Boys EP, Hell, Verlaine and Ficca’s first stab at greatness. There are also a few tracks I left out that are just not that good. But all in all, I think this is what you need when it comes to Richard Hell with Television. Without further ado, the tracklisting: 
ORK LOFT REHEARSALS, 19741. Fuck Rock and Roll (I’d Rather Read a Book)2. Horizontal Ascension3. I’m Gonna Find You4. I Don’t Care5. Marquee Moon
MAX’S KANSAS CITY, AUGUST 19746. You Rip My Feelings Out7. Excitement8. What I Heard9. Telepathic Valentine10. Change Your Channels11. Judy12. Psychotic Reaction
ENO / WILLIAMS DEMOS, DECEMBER 197413. Prove It14. Friction15. Venus De Milo16. Double Exposure17. Marquee Moon
CBGB, JANUARY 197518. Hard On Love (Fast Version)19. UFO20. Poor Circulation21. Breakin’ In My Heart
CBGB, MARCH 197522. Blank Generation
Download





TELEVISION: A Season In Hell
Soooo, here’s a compilation I’ve been working on for a while – an overview of the Richard Hell-era of Television, made up of rehearsals, live recordings and demos recorded between early 1974 and March 1975. Consider it a prequel of sorts to Kingdom Come. While the sound quality is rough on some of these tapes, the music is essential. This was a very different band than the one that would go on to record Marquee Moon a few years later – raw enough to make that album sound like Steely Dan by comparison. But if the playing is amateur-ish in places, it’s almost always thrillingly amateurish. And Hell definitely brought elements to the table that were lost once he was gone – a satirical, tongue-in-cheek humor, and his, um, unique bass stylings. He might not have been a very good bassist at this point, but he sure is enthusiastic, and that’s half the battle, isn’t it? I also get the feeling that Hell was the driving conceptual force behind the band at this stage – dig the elaborate and fanciful press release he penned (reprinted in Bryan Waterman’s excellent 33 1/3 volume): 
TOM VERLAINE - guitar, vocals, music, lyrics: Facts unknown. RICHARD HELL - bass, vocals, lyrics: Chip on shoulder. Mama’s boy. No personality. Highschool dropout. Mean. RICHARD LLOYD - guitar vocals: bleach-blond - mental institutions - male prostitute - suicide attempts. BILLY FICCA - drums: Blues bands in Philadelphia. Doesn’t talk much. Friendly. TELEVISION’s music fulfills the adolescent desire to fuck the girl you never met because you’ve just been run over by a car. Three minute songs of passion performed by four boys who make James Dean look like Little Nemo. Their sound is made distinctive by Hell’s rare Dan Electro bass, one that pops and grunts like no model presently available, and his unique spare patterns. Add to this Richard Lloyd’s blitzcrieg chop on his vintage Telecaster and Verlaine’s leads alternately psychotic Duane Eddy and Segovia on a ukelele with two strings gone. Verlaine, who uses an old Jazzmaster, when asked about the music said, “I don’t know. It tells the story. Like ‘The Hunch’ by the Robert Charles Quintet, or 'Tornado’ by Dale Hawkins. Those cats could track it down. I’ll tell you the secret.”
Richard Hell, ladies and gentlemen, punk’s first PR man. 
Take note! This isn’t a totally comprehensive collection – in particular, interested parties should seek out the Neon Boys EP, Hell, Verlaine and Ficca’s first stab at greatness. There are also a few tracks I left out that are just not that good. But all in all, I think this is what you need when it comes to Richard Hell with Television. Without further ado, the tracklisting: 
ORK LOFT REHEARSALS, 1974
1. Fuck Rock and Roll (I’d Rather Read a Book)
2. Horizontal Ascension
3. I’m Gonna Find You
4. I Don’t Care
5. Marquee Moon
MAX’S KANSAS CITY, AUGUST 1974
6. You Rip My Feelings Out
7. Excitement
8. What I Heard
9. Telepathic Valentine
10. Change Your Channels
11. Judy
12. Psychotic Reaction
ENO / WILLIAMS DEMOS, DECEMBER 1974
13. Prove It
14. Friction
15. Venus De Milo
16. Double Exposure
17. Marquee Moon
CBGB, JANUARY 1975
18. Hard On Love (Fast Version)
19. UFO
20. Poor Circulation
21. Breakin’ In My Heart
CBGB, MARCH 1975
22. Blank Generation

LOST TELEVISION RECORDINGS

On March 12, 2012 by Will Hermes

You may recall the video links I posted a while back of the band Television rehearsing in 1974
Well, the good folks at Doom & Gloom From The Tomb (yes, that’s a Richard Thompson reference) have been posting more crucial documents of the era. The first was titled Kingdom Come: The Lost Television Album. It’s a compilation of songs captured between ’74 – ’78 that never made it onto the band’s two Elektra releases.
Last week, they posted Television: A Season In Hell – a set of recordings made when the band still featured punk conceptualist Richard Hell on bass. Download both while you can: they are the best-sounding and best-annotated sources I’ve found for this stuff. Thanks D&GFTT!
Below: a flier for the very first Television gig, which in fact did not take place at CBGBs, but at the Townhouse Theater in Times Square, an old movie theater that the Modern Lovers had rented out for a show around the same time, as I mention in Love Goes To Buildings On Fire.


Invisible Hits: When Eno Met Television

Welcome to Invisible Hits, a column in which Tyler Wilcox scours the internet for the best (and strangest) bootlegs. Tyler also blogs at Doom & Gloom From the Tomb. This time, he digs up Television's pre-Marquee Moon demos, recorded by none other than Brian Eno.
During his unfathomably productive 1970s, Brian Eno made an indelible mark on the New York City rock scene, most famously on the trio of visionary LPs he made with Talking Heads and the era-defining no-wave comp No New York. But Eno's first encounter with the NYC scene remains unavailable: A five-song demo recorded 40 years ago with the then-fledgling Television.
Not available officially, at least—the demos have been available through more subterranean channels for decades. After Television, Eno, Island Records A&R man Richard Williams and engineer John Fausty entered Good Vibrations Studio near Times Square in late 1974, the CBGB scene was abuzz with rumors about the “legendary Eno Tapes.” The recordings subsequently appeared on Italian vinyl in the late 1970s (with Eno’s name misspelled on the sleeve as “Bryan”) and then debuted digitally in the 1990s on the essential Television odds-n-sods bootleg CD, Double Exposure. For unknown reasons, the demos were bypassed when Rhino reissued Television’s catalog back in 2003. But of course, the curious can now check out these unreleased tapes on YouTube.  
Taken as a whole, Television’s Eno Tapes provide a tantalizing glimpse of an alternate universe where two of the most powerful musical forces of the 1970s forged a long-lasting and fruitful working relationship. Alas, it was not to be. From the outset there was, shall we say... friction.  
In a 2013 blog post, Richard Williams wrote, “Tom [Verlaine] didn’t like the way things turned out, and later he blamed Eno … Tom might equally have blamed me or Fausty, but he and Eno didn’t get on, although there was no overt falling out. That still seems a shame. I didn’t realise at the time what a perfectionist Tom was, and that he wanted perfection even on his demos.” 
Verlaine elaborated in an interview with Sounds a few years after the fact: “The whole thing sounded like the Ventures. It sounded so bad. I kept on saying, why does it sound so bad? And [Eno would] say, ‘Whaddya mean? It sounds pretty good to me.'”
In a 2013 YouTube comment, Television’s guitarist Richard Lloyd went even further, disavowing Eno’s input altogether. “This was NOT produced by Brian Eno," he wrote. "Richard Williams from Island wanted to record the band and [said] that he would like to bring Eno along because Richard didn't know anything about how to record in studios. So we said OK, but didn't use a single idea that Eno brought.”
Further muddying the waters was the fact that Verlaine and bassist/vocalist Richard Hell were falling out personally and professionally. “By the winter of 1974-75, Tom was shutting me out beyond a doubt,” Hell wrote in his recent memoir I Dreamed I Was A Very Clean Tramp. “He had not only stopped allowing most of my songs onto set lists, but he’d told me not to move around onstage while he sang. He didn’t want any attention distracted from himself.” Hell claims that one of his songs, “Blank Generation,” was recorded during the Eno sessions (it’s never appeared on bootleg), but complained that Verlaine performed it “like a novelty song.” Just a few months after the sessions, Hell left the band for good. 
So, the whole situation was complicated to say the least. But despite the general negativity expressed above, Television’s Eno demos are very much worth hearing.
Take a listen to this demo of “Venus de Milo”, one of the band’s signature songs. While it doesn’t have the majestic quality of the Marquee Moon version, there’s a nervous energy present here that sounds strikingly like early Talking Heads—a band that was still six months away from its first show at CBGB, and whose members almost certainly caught early Television gigs.
“Double Exposure” (the only tune recorded at these sessions that wouldn’t show up on Marquee Moon) and “Friction” highlight the group’s garage rock roots, with a nagging, Nuggets-like riff stop-starting behind Verlaine’s sneering vocals and proto-no-wave guitar scrawls. “Prove It” comes across almost fully formed, a dream-like noir set to a sashaying salsa beat. Finally, the attempt at Marquee Moon’s epic title track is not quite the masterpiece it would eventually become. But it does hint at a more successful collaboration between Eno and Television, when at the peak of the song’s famous climb-the-stairs climax, a cascade of piano and ambient sound washes over the guitars, a zen-like calm overtaking the wiry tension. You could call it positively Eno-esque—except that Richard Williams says Verlaine played the keyboards here.
Ultimately, both Eno and Television would go their separate ways to create some of the most adventurous and influential music of the decade, leaving the legendary Eno demos as the only evidence of one of the great what-ifs of rock history. 


SF....Televsion




Even at a classy show of a classy band you have morons in the room....




Thanks for shooting the video yet, R. Hell has not been in Television for..... well.... quite a while.

Hate to focus on the negative but 80% people anywhere and everywhere are usually idiots.

(yelling in quiet moments to be part of the show etc.......clapping at the wrong times of songs...and much more. Embarrassing to have them represent LA. I usually look fwd to LA beating the cliches and surprising folks with good etiquette and respectful audience behavior. Rarely happens.)

Amazing  show by Tom Verlaine, Fred Smith, Billy Ficca and Jimmy Rip.(who did a fine job filling in for Richard Lloyd)
Teragram Ballroom Los Angeles July 2 2015

Television Jools Holland... John Cale 1992

Television '74 - I'm Gonna Find You, rare (unreleased)

television's i need a new adventure

Posted by gregor on Thursday, June 24th, 2010
howdy, peoples! what we have here are alternate takes to television’s second record adventure. believe these were recorded at bearsville studios back in 1978. it was released on cd back in 03, but you can only find for 30 bucks and upwards. there’s some pretty awesome stuff on here and cant recommend checking it out, enough.
- See more at: http://captainsdead.com/televisions-i-need-a-new-adventure.html#sthash.quEC8KoB.dpuf


Last year Aquarium Drunkard released RAM On L.A. — a local music compilation featuring eleven Los Angeles artists each covering a track off Paul McCartney’s 1971 LP, RAM. Today we’re following that up with L’Aventure — a local music compilation featuring eight Los Angeles artists paying tribute to Television’s sophomore LP, Adventure.
Like its predecessor, L’Aventure is an attempt to capture, if only for an instant, a slice of what is happening musically in L.A. in 2010. Or more specifically, it’s an attempt to highlight eight Los Angeles artists that have, individually, caught my ear over the past couple of years. By no means all encompassing, L’Aventureis a great jumping off point for those interested in the diverse landscape that is L.A.’s music.
Why Adventure? Why now? Like RAM, the album is used as a template—as a cohesive force—bonding these, at times, disparate artists together. A post-punk landmark, Television’s debut, Marquee Moon, tends to garner most of the adulation. It’s follow-up, Adventure, is now a classic album in its own right that seems to regularly get lost on the mix. In short, it is time for a reevaluation—perhaps this is the beginning of that conversation.
Available as a free high-quality download (FLAC and/or 320kbs mp3), we are encouraging those who have the means to donate to the Los Angeles based Silverlake Conservatory of Music100% of all donations go directly to the conservatory. Huge thanks to the artists who generously donated both their time and talents to this project. Artwork by Jeremy Benson, layout by Ben Kramer.



The best Television post, ever

Oh, hell yes, Television.....one of my very very faves. Back before the purge, I posted the classic "Live at the Old Waldorf", I'll reup it here along with lots and lots of other totally cool stuff. One of my favorite bands ever, almost impossible to "slot", often lumped into the CBGB punk scene, because, (lie their bretheren Talking Heads) they weren't especially "punk" in their approach, they more just happened to be in the neighborhood. I absolutley loved, and continue to love to this date, the incomparable neo-psychedelia, the totally unique guitar work of both Tom Verlane and Richard Lloyd, and the thrill and excitement of their live recordings, how I'd have loved to have been present for one......

First things first, their first album "Marquee Moon"....one of my ten favorite albums of all, the majestic title track would merit that honor, but it turns out that's about a fourth of it...."Venus"...."Guiding Light".....I'd just be listing the tracks which I'll get too anyway, "Marquee Moon" is presented here in a stellar expanded edition, with bonus tracks including the amazing "Little Johnny Jewel", alternate versions of "Marquee Moon".....what more could you ask? Simply one of the greatest albums of the last 50 years, and in an incredible expanded version. Line forms here.....

The follow up album, "Adventure" is not "Marquee Moon", but it is a smokin' affair a well, "Ain't Tht Nothin'" is a classic, "Glory", "Foxhole"....again, why just list the tracks they are all great.

And that is it. They made those two albums (they reunited seveal years later for another album, which I didn't like and does not appear here)......so we must delve into some other sources. Question for pondering: What other band made only two albums in its career, and had them be as stellar as these? (I do not count the latter-day "reunion" thing.

OK I have so much stuff here that I want to share, I have to leave some of it out. I will of course, include "Live at the Old Waldorf", only one of the twenty greatest live albums of the rock era. A rare set of 8-track demos for "Marquee Moon" which includes the 13th Floor Elevators "Fire Engine", and a version of Richard Hell's (he of course was once a member) of "Blank Generation". Another ancient set of demos comes from the Richard Hell era, a very early version of "Venus", a cover of "Psychotic Reaction".....if you are a Television fan, your mouth should be watering!

"The Blow Up" was released on ROIR cassette (only), is thankfully available as a 2 CD st.....simply another chance to marvel at the band's breathtaking live chops. "Double Exposure" is another fie set of early demos, might as well put it up too.....and then....well, I have probably 100 of their concerts....quality varies, the performances ALWAYS are fine, the recordings, well, not always so much. I am going to include a double set from Portland Oregon, 1978, farily at random, and, reluctantly, I'm going to put up a nearly unlistenable set from CBGB 1975, a quite rare set featuring Ms. Patti Smith joining the band on stage. Unparalleled as a historical curiosity, GOD how I wish it were a better recording.

You know the drill.....I have tons of liev shows from the band, if you have a special favorite, one you attended or just heard and enjoyed, let me know and I'll put it up as well....but for now enjoy these great albums from one of Americas greatest bands.......leave a comment if it's not too much trouble. This one is a labor of love for me, always was and always will be a favorite band of mine.

Links should be up in the morning! Have a good night!

MARQUEE MOON (EXPANDED EDITION)-01 See No Evil/02 Venus/03 Friction/04 Marquee Moon/05 Elevation/06 Guiding Light/07 Prove It/08 Torn Curtain/09 Little Johnny Jewel (parts 1 & 2)/10  See No Evil (Alt)/11 Friction (Alt)/12 Marquee Moon (Alt)/13 Untitled Instrumental

ADVENTURE-01 Glory/02 Days/03 Foxhole/04 Careful/05 Carried Away/06 The Fire/07 Ain't Thta Nothin'/08 The Dream's Dream

LIVE AT THE OLD WALDORF-01 The Dreams Dream/02 Venus/03 Foxhole/04 Careful/05 Ain't That Nothin'/06 Little Johnny Jewel/07 Friction/08 Marquee Moon/09 Satisfaction

8-TRACK DEMOS-01 Prove It/02 Friction/03 Venus/04 Marquee Moon/05 Double Exposure/06 Fire Engine/07 Blank Generation/08 Double Exposure

RICHARD HELL LIVE & DEMOS 1973-5-01 Eat the Light/02 Venus/03 Excitement/04 I'm Gonna Find You/05 Horizonatal Ascension/06 Closer (Neon Boys)/07 You Rip my Feelings Out/08 Hard On Love/09 Excitement/10 Judy/11 Psychotic Reaction/12 What I Heard/13 Change Your Channels/14 Double Exposure/15 Fuck Rock N Roll/16 UFO/17 Poor Circulation/18 Blank Generation

DOUBLE EXPOSURE-01 Prove It/02 Friction/03 Venus/04 Double Exposure/05 Marquee Moon/06 Hand On Love/07 Friction/08 Careful/09 Prove It/10 Fire Engine/11 Little Johnny Jewel/12 Prove It/13 Friction/14 Venus/15 Double Exposure/16 Marquee Moon

THE BLOW UP DISC 1-01 Fire Engine/02 See No Evil/03 Prove It/04 Elevation/05 I Don't Care/06 Venus/07 Foxhole/08 Ain't That Nothin'/09 Knockin' On Heavens Door

THE BLOW UP DISC 2-01 Little Johnny Jewel/02 Friction/03 Marquee Moon/04 Satisfaction

PORTLAND 7/2/78 D1-01 The Dreams Dream/02 Elevation/03 GLory/04 Foxhole/05 Little Johnny Jewel/06 Ain't That Nothin'

PORTLAND 7/2/78 D2-01 Friction/02 Marquee Moon/03 Lori/04 Satisfaction/05 Fire Engine/06 A Mi A Mo Re/07 Adventure

CBGB 1975 WITH PATTI SMITH-01 Space Monkey/02 Distant Fingers/03 Fire Engine/04 Breakin In My Heart/05 Foxhole/06 Real Good Time Together/07 Redando Beach/08 Birdland/09 Unknown/10 MMO/11 Gloria/12 Venus/13 Marquee Moon/14 Friction







6/30/15

On Guitars and Women

Guitar Woman
The hips of a guitar transfix the eyes of boys almost as completely as the hips of a woman. Even female guitarists the world over can attest to the pleasures of the physical flow of a well-made instrument. Even the piano, which most agree to be the world’s most popular instrument (guitar is usually considered 2nd) features a sensual curvature to its design. So why was the guitar designed to evoke a female figure?
Realists will explain that the curve of an acoustic guitar allows it to be cradled comfortably on the thigh of the musician. Fair enough. But it still doesn’t explain why the proportions are consistent with the human anatomy. Notice that the top pair of curves in the picture here are smaller than the lower curves, just as it is on a woman’s body. Ralph Denyer, in his book The Guitar Handbook (in a curiously titled section titled “The anatomy of the acoustic guitar”), explains that the shape of an acoustic guitar’s “soundbox” amplifies the sound of the vibrating strings. The question presses on: why is the female figure the ideal shape for this acoustic amplification?
The different parts of an acoustic guitar are even designated with names like “waist,” “back,” and “rib.” Symbolism can be drawn from this idea. The distinctly Freudian neck of the guitar is the decidedly “masculine” part of the instrument, which pairs with the female “body” to give birth to sound. Music. This could be what draws poets, adolescents, and hopeless romantics to the instrument. Not just the ease of its portability, but the subconscious sexuality and romance at work when a guitar is used to create music. The idea of instinctively using music as a metaphor for existence is not a new concept. Look no further than Pythagoras’ notion of musica universalis–the so-called “music of the spheres.”
The image of a guitar seems to get its power from its feminine form. It is a form ideally suited for the creation of both life and music.


https://lithe.wordpress.com/2008/01/01/on-guitars-and-women/